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Who"s who and what"s what in Shakespeare giving references by topics to notable passages and significant expressions, brief histories of the plays, geographical names and historical incidents, mention of all characters and sketches of important ones, together with explanations of allusions and obscure and obsolete words and phrases by Evangeline M. O"Connor

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  • 81 Currently reading

Published by Avenel Books : distributed by Crown Publishers in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Dictionaries,
  • Characters and characteristics in literature -- Dictionaries

Book details:

Edition Notes

Reprint of the 1887 ed. published by University Society, New York under title: Topical index to the Booklover"s edition of Shakespeare; with new introd.

Statementby Evangeline M. O"Connor ; with a foreword by Alice Sachs.
GenreDictionaries.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR2892 .O44
The Physical Object
Pagination419 p. ;
Number of Pages419
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4729333M
ISBN 100517259230
LC Control Number78017348

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Macbeth, hands down, should be number one as it is the best of Shakespeare's works (at least in my opinion). I have read 5 of the works listed (as I am only in high school and haven't had the vocabulary or analysis skills to read more earlier).   Get this from a library! Who's who and what's what in Shakespeare: giving references by topics to notable passages and significant expressions, brief histories of the plays, geographical names and historical incidents, mention of all characters and sketches of important ones, together with explanations of allusions and obscure and obsolete words and phrases. Knock, knock. Who's there? We bet you're waiting for the punch line. In our modern world, this is a classic set up for a classic joke. We've heard this whole routine over and over again since we were kids. The Porter's laugh-a-minute style in this scene launched a whole series of "knock-knock jokes.". It is a handy reference, especially to the newcomer to this period, to obtain *a little* more depth of knowledge into lives one may hear referenced while reading, say, Shakespeare studies. The best-targeted audience is the general lay public or undergraduates.4/5(2).

Get this from a library! Who's who and what's what in Shakespeare: giving references by topics to notable passages and significant expressions, brief histories of the plays, geographical names and historical incidents, mention of all characters and sketches of important ones, together with explanations of allusions and obscure and obsolete words and phrases. In his book, Life of Shakespeare, Sidney Lee claimed the entire Red Dragon episode was probably a forgery by John Payne Collier, and in , Sydney Race revealed that the relevant pages were missing from the original journal and argued that a ship's crew would be incapable of mastering two of Shakespeare's most difficult plays. From the age of seven, Shakespeare attended The King's School, in his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of nine, he was introduced to Latin by his tutor Simon Hunt, who persuaded Shakespeare's mother, Mary Arden, to buy her son a Latin "crib". Thanks for the A2A. So far you’ve got an excellent, historically-informed list, but somehow Gert and Joshua have left out what may have been Shakespeare’s favorite book of all, that treasury of great stories: Ovid’s Metamorphoses. He appears to ha.

  William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright and actor of the Renaissance era. He was an important member of the King’s Men company of theatrical players from roughly onward.   On reading the thriller The Shakespeare Secret, I became aware of the controversy surrounding the works attributed to Shakespeare and whether they were actually written by him. Michell's book was recommended in the bibliography as the most open-minded examination of the major claimants, from Francis Bacon to the Earl of Derby, and Michell does 4/5.   Othello, in full Othello, the Moor of Venice, tragedy in five acts by William Shakespeare, written in –04 and published in in a quarto edition from a transcript of an authorial text published in the First Folio of seems to have been based on a version revised by Shakespeare himself that sticks close to the original almost line by line but introduces numerous. The book itself was relatively thick, it wasn't the first in a series, and I found it at half price books on a shelf with many books by the same author. This was in the mid 00s, so the book was probably decently older than that. Very typical fantasy stylized cover. Here's what I can remember from the first bits of .